Chinese Moon Rover Making Tracks on Lunar Far Side
Chinese Moon Rover Making Tracks on Lunar Far Side
Chinese Moon Rover Making Tracks on Lunar Far Side
Chinese Moon Rover Making Tracks on Lunar Far Side

Chinese Moon Rover Making Tracks on Lunar Far Side

On Wednesday night (Jan. 2), the Chang'e 4 rover and its stationary-lander companion pulled off the first-ever soft touchdown on the lunar far side, coming to a rest inside the 115-mile-wide (186 kilometers) Von Kármán Crater.

The six-wheeled rover, known as Yutu 2, isn't pausing to catch its breath, as a newly released photo shows. Yutu 2 has already put a fair bit of space between itself and the lander, trundling over near the rim of a small crater on the floor of Von Kármán, which itself lies within an even larger impact feature — the 1,550-mile-wide (2,500 km) South Pole-Aitken Basin.

Both Yutu 2 and the lander sport four science instruments, which they'll use to study the surrounding dirt and rocks and probe the far side's subsurface. Such observations could help scientists better understand the moon's composition, structure and evolution, Chinese space officials have said. 

Chang'e 4's images and data come home via a relay satellite called Queqiao, which is parked at a gravitationally stable spot beyond the moon. (The lunar far side always points away from Earth, so communicating directly with rovers or landers there is a no-go.)

Queqiao, which launched in May 2018, is collecting some data of its own. The spacecraft totes an astronomy instrument, and it has sent home striking images of the moon and Earth from its unique vantage point in space.